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So many things to be thankful for we just need eye to see them

Happy Thanksgiving EVERYONE

XO

Eunice aka nutsfortreasure

 

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My Posts

The Beach Is A Mess

Well last night we lost an hour of sleep due to our moving our clocks ahead in spring as we do here in New Hampshire for Daylight Savings Time.  I went to bed early after being at the beach.  Yes a perfect day in the mid 40’s.  It was a very Messy Beach and some lost their homes.  I am not sure if you caught it on your news as I never know if AP news will broadcast things that happen here, all over the world.

You know I will keep you up on the stories in the news throughout New England well at least when it comes to storms and flooding.

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JT and I walked along the shoreline for exercise and play while her daddy searched for treasure.  I left her Frisbee in the truck and grabbed a stick we keep for windy days.  I knew she would want to jump waves if we played with her favorite toy but today was not a day to be playing in the sea.

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The waves were strong and very powerful.  One after another slammed into the coastline.  Remember we go when the tide is heading out.  He only hunts low tides and I hunt the beaches when people have just left from a day of beach going and I never go down to the water with my machine.  This is winter though in New England and we had an enormous coastal storm.  It was very far out to sea but we still got nailed by it.  The beach had 3 days easy of seas with 20 foot plus seas.  It slammed into sea walls and busted them again.  Roads were closed due to rock and four feet of water in some sections where the beach breached an area where the state has determined  a pretty coastal route would be.  Mother Nature has a funny way of taking back what always should have been a place of give and take.  I never really think to add video to these lengthy posts but if you want to go to the web to look here are a few local news stations where you can see it in action.

http://www.wmur.com
http://www.necn.com

So as we walked the dog and I we met others who were shocked by what they saw had taken place with yet another storm.  The dunes which help to keep the water from homes and businesses were just about gone.  They were huge.  They were tall with pretty grasses holding them together.  They had been a part of our lives forever if you grew up in New England.  We were not allowed to ride dune buggies on them they were not for fun.  They were to protect us and a place for wild birds to make their nests.  Where would they go now?  Tax money spent over and over to fix the beach.  We have people who flock here from Canada and other parts of the world will they still come?  I am sad people once again lost their homes.  Yes they were silly to want to build by the sea but she is so beautiful on most days. Look at other beaches.  Huge hotel chains line the beach in Virginia, Florida too.  Everyone wants to get close to the sea.  These past thirty eight years I can remember,  spending so much time visiting them  have seen so much change.

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When sand was washed out to sea dunes collapsed  and drainage pipes show up I guess filthy storm drain water screened through all the sand was supposed to be OK for the oceans now with rain coming and it will fall for days where will it go besides straight into our ocean that feeds us. So very sad.

 

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Foundations showing up from buildings long ago gone.  I used to go to the one that stood here beside the sea.  The Frolics was famous for music, and  drinks.  Many years ago there had even been a huge swimming pool alongside this beach.  Salisbury Beach have you ever been.  It used to be a fun place to go not so much anymore well unless you are a dog with a great Mom and Dad.

 

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She really wants to run time to let her off leash for a few minutes while I show you some of what we saw at the beach that was a mess.

 

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That is JT’s Dad hunting the beach

 

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Last one for this post

See the metal stakes?

The dunes came out this far and a wooden fence was attached to these all along the shoreline to KEEP PEOPLE OFF THEM but no one told the Sea to  STAY AWAY.

 

 

 

 

 

My Posts

Weeping Willow

She really is weeping as her days are now numbered.  The Beavers started to attack her bark and left plenty of gashes to tell me they were going to finish her off.  This tress was a small beauty when I mover her in 1988 here it is 2012 and will be gone if our bodies hold up, by 2013.  I really need to be the one to take her down if left to the beavers it may take out the bedroom and us if we are in the bed.  We do not have thousands to pay a tree company so we will do it a little at a time.  I felt like we won in a way because one section they were gnawing on is now down, they will know I have had enough.  I know they have to survive as well but our loss of a home or possible life or that of pets we love will have us working hard to take it down safely.  I will use the willow pieces as stepping-stones in the yard, well till they become one with the landscape once again.  She did her best to suck up flood waters over and over and though she looks gnarly and battered for all the storms she withstood  her insides were beautifully healthy.  The squirrels have lived up in the nook for years as winter approaches I do not know where they will go but sadly it is out of our hands she has to go on our terms to keep our home safe from ruin.  There will be more grass to mow  but I will plant a new Willow in her place and wrap her tender bark with metal fencing then a pretty fence for the outside world to see and I will fill it with plants and flowers the wildlife will love for cover and food, it is the best I can do.

 

Beavers
Damage a Beaver does

Looks like he was leaving me a NOTE

 

beavers

 

beaver damage
Port of Entry

 

 

 

weeping willow
No longer Healthy

 

cleaning up the smaller pieces

 

First huge limb down and being cut up

 

Now for thinner slices to reuse as stepping-stones in the garden area

That will have to wait as we are so sore from all we did yesterday.

I will miss her when she is gone I hate killing trees Beaver well now

 

Tools

 

Joy of having your own HOMESTEAD and I thought Sunday’s were a day to REST!

 

I am happy to report no Beavers were killed yesterday while we were ready for them but we did have visitors 6 of them and they could not be happier with the river lower than it was and all the bugs they were finding.

 

Mallards are not DESTRUCTIVE just Pretty
🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Posts

Sandy

Here is a story posted on Yahoo about what is possible for us here on our side of the US and also on the west coast of CA they just had a 7.7 Earthquake.  Just say a little prayer for our world today would you.

 

SHIP BOTTOM, N.J. – Forget distinctions like tropical storm or hurricane. Don’t get fixated on a particular track. Wherever it hits, the rare behemoth storm inexorably gathering in the eastern U.S. will afflict a third of the country with sheets of rain, high winds and heavy snow, say officials who warned millions in coastal areas to get out of the way.

“We’re looking at impact of greater than 50 to 60 million people,” said Louis Uccellini, head of environmental prediction for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

As Hurricane Sandy barrelled north from the Caribbean — where it left nearly five dozen dead — to meet two other powerful winter storms, experts said it didn’t matter how strong the storm was when it hit land: The rare hybrid storm that follows will cause havoc over 800 miles from the East Coast to the Great Lakes.

“This is not a coastal threat alone,” said Craig Fugate, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. “This is a very large area.”

President Barack Obama was monitoring the storm and working with state and locals governments to make sure they get the resources needed to prepare, administration officials said.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie declared a state of emergency Saturday as hundreds of coastal residents started moving inland and the state was set to close its casinos. New York’s governor was considering shutting down the subways to avoid flooding and half a dozen states warned residents to prepare for several days of lost power.

Sandy weakened briefly to a tropical storm Saturday but was soon back up to Category 1 strength, packing 75 mph winds. It was about 275 miles south-southeast of Cape Hatteras, N.C., and moving northeast at 14 mph as of 2 a.m. Sunday. Forecasters said the storm was spreading tropical stormconditions across the coastline of North Carolina, and they were expected to move up the mid-Atlantic coastline late Sunday. Experts said the storm was most likely to hit the southern New Jersey coastline by late Monday or early Tuesday.

Governors from North Carolina, where heavy rain was expected Sunday, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday.

Christie, who was widely criticized for not interrupting a family vacation in Florida while a snowstorm pummeled the state in 2010, broke off campaigning for Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney in North Carolina on Friday to return home.

“I can be as cynical as anyone,” Christie said in a bit of understatement Saturday. “But when the storm comes, if it’s as bad as they’re predicting, you’re going to wish you weren’t as cynical as you otherwise might have been.”

The storm forced the presidential campaign to juggle schedules. Romney scrapped plans to campaign Sunday in the swing state of Virginia and switched his schedule for the day to Ohio. First lady Michelle Obama cancelled an appearance in New Hampshire for Tuesday, and Obama moved a planned Monday departure for Florida to Sunday night to beat the storm. He cancelled appearances in Northern Virginia on Monday and Colorado on Tuesday.

In Ship Bottom, just north of Atlantic City, Alice and Giovanni Stockton-Rossini spent Saturday packing clothing in the backyard of their home, a few hundred yards from the ocean on Long Beach Island. Their neighbourhood was under a voluntary evacuation order, but they didn’t need to be forced.

“It’s really frightening,” Alice Stockton-Rossi said. “But you know how many times they tell you, ‘This is it, it’s really coming and it’s really the big one’ and then it turns out not to be? I’m afraid people will tune it out because of all the false alarms before … (but) this one might be the one.”

A few blocks away, Russ Linke was taking no chances. He and his wife secured the patio furniture, packed the bicycles into the pickup truck, and headed off the island.

What makes the storm so dangerous and unusual is that it is coming at the tail end of hurricane season and the beginning of winter storm season, “so it’s kind of taking something from both,” said Jeff Masters, director of the private service Weather Underground.

Masters said the storm could be bigger than the worst East Coast storm on record — the 1938 New England hurricane known as the Long Island Express, which killed nearly 800 people. “Part hurricane, part nor’easter — all trouble,” he said. Experts said to expect high winds over 800 miles and up to 2 feet of snow as far inland as West Virginia.

And the storm was so big, and the convergence of the three storms so rare, that “we just can’t pinpoint who is going to get the worst of it,” said Rick Knabb, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Officials are particularly worried about the possibility of subway flooding in New York City, said Uccellini.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo told the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to prepare to shut the city’s subways, buses and suburban trains by Sunday, but delayed making a final decision. The city shut the subways down before last year’s Hurricane Irene, and a Columbia University study predicted that an Irene surge just 1 foot higher would have paralyzed lower Manhattan.

Up and down the Eastern Seaboard and far inland, officials urged residents and businesses to prepare in big ways and little.

On Saturday evening, Amtrak began cancelling train service to parts of the East Coast, including between Washington, D.C., and New York. Airlines started moving planes out of East Coast airports to avoid damage and adding flights out of New York and Washington on Sunday in preparation for flight cancellations on Monday.

The Virginia National Guard was authorized to call up to 500 troops to active duty for debris removal and road-clearing, while homeowners stacked sandbags at their front doors in coastal towns. At a Home Depot in Virginia Beach, employee Dave Jusino said the store was swamped with customers.

“We have organized chaos, is what I call it,” Jusino said. “We organize a group of 10 associates, give them certain responsibilities and we just separate the lines, organize four customers at a time, load up their cars and get them out the door and then take the next customers.”

Utility officials warned rains could saturate the ground, causing trees to topple into power lines, and told residents to prepare for several days at home without power. “We’re facing a very real possibility of widespread, prolonged power outages,” said Ruth Miller, spokeswoman for the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency.

Warren Ellis, who was on an annual fishing pilgrimage on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, didn’t act fast enough to get home. Ellis’ 73-year-old father managed to get off uninhabited Portsmouth Island near Cape Hatteras by ferry Friday. But the son and his camper got stranded when high winds and surf forced the ferry service to suspend operations Saturday.

“We might not get off here until Tuesday or Wednesday, which doesn’t hurt my feelings that much,” said Ellis, 44, of Amissville, Va. “Because the fishing’s going to be really good after this storm.”

Last year, Hurricane Irene poked a new inlet through the island, cutting the only road off Hatteras Island for about 4,000.

In Connecticut, the Naval Submarine Base in Groton prepared to install flood gates and pile up sandbags to protect against flooding while its five submarines remain in port through the storm.

Lobsterman Greg Griffen in Maine wasn’t taking any chances; he moved 100 of his traps to deep water, where they are less vulnerable to shifting and damage in a storm.

“Some of my competitors have been pulling their traps and taking them right home,” said Griffen. The dire forecast “sort of encouraged them to pull the plug on the season.”

In Muncy Valley in northern Pennsylvania, Rich Fry learned his lesson from last year, when Tropical Storm Lee inundated his Katie’s Country Store.

In between helping customers picking up necessities Saturday, Fry was moving materials above the flood line. Fry said he was still trying to recover from the losses of last year’s storm, when he estimates he lost $35,000 in merchandise.

“It will take a lot of years to cover that,” he said.

Christie’s emergency declaration will force the shutdown of Atlantic City’s 12 casinos for only the fourth time in the 34-year history of legalized gambling here. The approach of Hurricane Irene shut down the casinos for three days last August.

Atlantic City officials said they would begin evacuating the gambling hub’s 30,000 residents at noon Sunday, busing them to mainland shelters and schools.

Tom Foley, Atlantic City’s emergency management director, recalled the March 1962 storm when the ocean and the bay met in the centre of the city.

“This is predicted to get that bad,” he said.

Eighty-five-year-old former sailor Ray Leonard said if he had loved ones living in the projected landfall area, he would tell them to leave. Leonard knows to heed the warnings.

He and two crewmates in his 32-foot sailboat, Satori, rode out 1991’s infamous “perfect storm,” made famous by the Sebastian Junger bestseller of the same name, before being plucked from the Atlantic off Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., by a Coast Guard helicopter.

“Don’t be rash,” Leonard said in a telephone interview Saturday from his home in Fort Myers, Fla. “Because if this does hit, you’re going to lose all those little things you’ve spent the last 20 years feeling good about.”

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My Posts

Before Sandy Arrives

Flooding before Sandy
2 days before Sandy brings her rains

 

 

 

Beavers Enter Here
Beavers Enter Here

 

 

Land is saturated
Still in the yard 2 days before “Sandy”

 

 

Willow
Beavers trying to take my 30+yr old Willow

 

 

 

Big Willow
Can it be saved?

 

 

 

Pulling Dam Down Below Here
He went by boat

 

 

 

Waiting
Reflections of Trees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Posts

Plum Island

My take on Mother Nature and her fury, in one of my favorite places  to walk and fish.

Just the other side of Newburyport MA is a place called Plum Island.

 

This is a place  you will see just before you go over the marsh and hit the island.

 

 

We have a nuclear plant in Seabrook ,NH and when all the protests

were  going on,   residents  knew that there would be  No Way Out!

Sign stands after all these years as a reminder.

 

Well it seems like the Nuclear Plant is safer for these residents,

than the sea they love  to live next too.

 

The ocean is taking more and more of the beach that used to be their buffer.

Homes have been undermined by the surf and ultimately pushed by machines onto the beach at low tide and then

picked up and placed in rigs and taken to the local landfill.

 

The politicians keep throwing money at this situation.

Permits to re-build these homes maybe issued.

This problem that will only become worse as the worlds oceans rise, as predicted they will.

They installed these a few years ago,  to save these homes but surly  you can see no mater how much sand and barriers are brought in

the Atlantic Ocean will take what it needs for space.

 

They warn people who love this place to Stay Away!

 

These were once completely covered with sand and the beach built back up,  by sand hauled to this area,  all at the taxpayers expense.

 

 

This is just for this one stretch of  ocean front property.

Who came up with the plan years ago to allow homes here?

So many places we can not go near now because of the dangers these

homes present and we can’t forget the  Nesting Plovers!

 

I will continue to come here month after month to document the loss of a beautiful stretch of beach.

I have so many fond memories I can not help but watch  and see what time has in store for this wild place.

 

I will miss  this place when she is gone.

 

 

 

 

 

My Posts

Storms batter our coastline

The beaches along New England are constantly being battered.

Storm after storm starts to change the landscape.of our shore.

Wave after wave rolls in with a fury.

We have sea walls to keep it from our homes, though we continue to build in harm’s way.

Homes are lost, lives are changed, personal items lost to the sea.

As a home is lost, plans to rebuild get underway.

This story will have updates along the way,  as it is forever changing in these parts ,we call home.

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Millions are spent to save the homes of those, who just had to get as close to the sea, as they could.

Permits are given out to build another  in its place.

Taxes are spent on baffles, to try to keep erosion at bay.

It as you can clearly see  it is not working.

Just a waste of money in my point of view, to fight a force so much stronger than man.

The more beach we have left the happier she will be lol

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